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Post Info TOPIC: how modules size influences a float out project


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how modules size influences a float out project
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Let`s check on a flat raft platform of 14x14m this would be more or less 200 blocks (cubes) of 1x1m each.

If you build it in blocks and raft them up you can do so a hundred miles from the waterfront – transport them with a car trailer – float them out from every boat dock.

A 14×14 structure built in one piece needs a MAYOR drydock to float out – you need to rent that dock for a couple of months for building it.

So what you safe on “raft up cost” might be 100 time less than your drydock cost.

Which way you go and which way is more economic depends much on your local situation. You might have 5m tides that float out your big module for free on a secluded beach.

When you start building a house sized structure on a beach you might be subject to mayor problems with neighbours, port captain, coast guard etc.. that can cost you a lot of time and money. This will hardly happen when you come in with a 1x1m cube every 3 days and disappear on the water after 10 minutes handling time and establish the raft up site out of sight.

In general the real cost factors are not material and workforce cost, but third party interference cost, waterfront handling cost, and similar items. Make sure you have a good plan for that before deciding the module size.

Wil



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to bring a 14m wide structure with a truck from a inland building site may cost 50 times than its building cost – street transport is designed for a load width of not more than 2,5m – standard trucks are desigened for not more than 40 tons. So are standard cranes.

Any piece of industrial equipment that widly exeeds standard width and weight has a hourly rent of well above the structure building cost.

There is no free beach nor dock nor water access – at least not for a 14x14m structure – access is where a access road is, where there is a road there is a waterfront settlement, a owner who claims a free sight in front of his property. Maybe you can anchor your platform where nobdy lives and claims a free horizon, but you can not access the waterfront with heavy load trucks there.

So if you ask for realistic quotes for all those processes you may well find that the little bit more labor or material is the far smaller bug to swallow.

What is the best module size depends on local factors and can not be decided by discussion forum. You need to do a pilot project to get a realistic view how those cost factors fall in place. When doing a pilot project you will apreciate the ability to move the building site to another place within a few days. The smaller the modules the higher the adaptability of the project – this seems to mean little while you sit in front of a computer and imagine it. But it means a lot when the shipyard which rented you a empty space very economic gets a ship building offer for the same space and has to decline it because your platform is occupieing the place.

Wil

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