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Post Info TOPIC: cost per squaremeter floating housing space


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cost per squaremeter floating housing space
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cost per squaremeter for living on a Seastead (in this case "Baystead"  - far from oceanic waves)

 



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. . .


The baseline is if you check on the amount of concrete that is built into the foundation of your house (let’s assume you live in a decent one) You will find that you can arrange the same amount of concrete instead in form of a slab in form of a honeycomb and the house will float. So basicly building the foundation should cost the same on water or on land. The building lot will be cheaper on the water, building code and city interference will be less, transport logistics will be less complicated, moving around heavy items during construction will be less complicated, so all in all building on the water should come out at signifficant lower cost per squaremeter in the end.
http://concretesubmarine.activeboard.com/t43963728/floating-real-estate-building-lots-on-the-water/
Once the house is afloat and part of a cluster of other houses with a basic infrastructure in place located in a bay that excludes big ocean waves, living in a water based house is no different than living in a land house, execpt that you use a boat instead of a car.
As the space is less competed and less interfered compared to land housing all will be more economic it is the personal version of the quest for interference freedom and personl space.
http://concretesubmarine.activeboard.com/t56680633/the-reasons-why-oceanic-business-is-the-next-big-thing-to-co/


Wilfried Ellmer http://yook3.com



In the bay of Cartagena the water area of the bay (hurricane free calm water space) is about twice the size of the metropolitan area of the City itself – so a lot of space to go for housing and seasteading…
Navegante Cholon is doing it already.



http://concretesubmarine.activeboard.com/t47932816/navegante-cholon/


What turns the floating house into a baystead is the “cluster idea” if you put several units together and complete the whole thing with a infrastructure (electricity water gas internet), you have a “settlement” or a “housing development” or a “baystead cluster” if you want to call it that way. To be a seastead you need to make it capable to stand the open ocean – the ramform would do that.


http://concretesubmarine.activeboard.com/t51926036/establishing-a-ramform-floating-base-in-the-high-seas-concre/


By adding a bow that can handle ocean waves to the concept.
You can definitly get investors to the idea to develop a “currently not used area close to the city center” that has the size of twice the current metropolitan area… all this a thriving ermerging megacity in a “latin tiger nation” member of the CIVETS club, like Cartagena.



Cartagena lights, skyscrappers and a (small part) of the bay in bocagrande with yachts and ships anchoring interference free.



Seasteading Floating City Project … Baystead.

 



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The topic of cost per squaremeter of living on a Seastead is also discussed on a forum of the Seasteading institute - see below

 

www.seasteading.org/forum-list/topic/how-much-would-you-pay-to-live-on-a-seastead/



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How much would you pay to live on a Seastead? There is not much of a mistery around this. Exactly the same that i am paying for housing on land, as this is what my personal economics can afford. The how much is not a “theoretical choice” it is a “practical settlement” if the cost of living on a seastead is higher than in the suburbs no signifficant segment of the population can afford it, that is the economic baseline for seasteading. And why should somebody who can afford living space squaremeters at yacht prices settle for living in a condo instead on a yacht. This is also the reason why ship seasteading and oil platform seasteading will not happen, marine transport and big oil business can handle squaremeter prices hundreds of times higher than suburban housing. Squaremeter pricing is the core of a seasteading venture. So the real interesting question is can we meet the price point. Or can we build floating real estate at the same price as land based real estate. At least for the bay of Cartagena where i live the answer to the question is a clear YES. This is because we can build floating concrete honeycomb structures at prices that a waterfront building lot would cost. http://concretesubmarine.activeboard.com/t43963728/floating-real-estate-building-lots-on-the-water/



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A Baystead works very much like VENICE anything is like being on land, except your transport is a boat, and the streets are water channels. The Economy is “Ship based and Sea Trade oriented”. Bring in stuff like food containers is even easier than on land so grocery prices should be equal or lower than in the nearby land city – those basics are solved in the “working model” of Venice for centuries. Other than in Venice where space is limited a floating development can expand on the watersurface so it would be much less “piled together” than Venice is. Unfortunatly building floating concrete foundations was not feasible in the time when Venice was engineered otherwise it would be a true floating city instead of a “swamp piling based city” already.


http://concretesubmarine.activeboard.com/t56710025/venice-italy-how-to-do-instructions-for-seasteading-from-his/


Real estate prices in a floating City will be much lower than in Venice as waterspace space is easy available. By the way a baystead can have a land connection like Venice is having one (you can enter the city in train).

 



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Ken, i think your idea "I want/need a turnkey residence on a true floating city." is a very good one. I think in early discussions on the forums there was a concept error in assuming that as this is a "new frontier" a "hands on pionieer type" would be necessary to develop it.

We live in a globalized world "urban living style" is what 80% of all people do. The food on the table in a city apartment comes from a container that comes by sea-freight and supplies your local supermarket. The key to understand is SEAF REIGHT technically a Baystead is a "port city" by nature. So access to anything that circulates in the global trade streams in containers is much easier and economic than for a land city, what means supply is easier, prices are lower than for a land city.

Also if you call a plumber to your penthouse in Manhattan at 9 o clock in the morning he will charge you an hour traffic jam, half an hour waiting for the elevator in a crowd of people in the building and the effort of carrying all stuff by hand as the access in truck is not possible due to parking restrictions. This makes plumber service in Manhattan expensive. A baystead in sight of Manhattans skyscrapers on the other hand can be acessed without that kind of interference cost - what makes plumber service there affordable.

So i think the living style on a baystead will be "urban and plugged into global trade streams". What is exactly the way you live it in any city apartment. For me the idea that "everyting is expensive and complicated out at sea" is fundamently flawed, and based on the historic idea that a city is supplied by the sourrounding farms, this supply model is dead for over hundred years now. We need to understand how cities are supplied today in a global economy by ports and container terminals, how chineese noodles really reach our refrigerator, and why "out on the water" has become "priviledged" instead of "remote" in a world of global marine trade routes and container supply. The "boater supply model" is not relevant for a "piece of floating urban terrain plugged into container supply routes".
Far from offering "rudimentary lifestyle" at "elevated remote location cost", a baystead will offer "full service urban lifestyle at reduced cost" due to simplification of logistics (container), reduction of interference costs (traffic jam), and real estate space cost (squaremeters for housing development on the water cost less than in Manhattan they are free).

A baystead does not really need the presence of secundary distributors like Sears, or Target, or Belk, or Home Depot, or Fastenall, or Staples, Food Giant, and their land based truck and warehousing infrastructure, it is plugged in the supply lines that supply those supplieres due to its location on the marine trade routes…

http://www.seasteading.org/forum-list/topic/how-much-would-you-pay-to-live-on-a-seastead/page/2/#post-23478



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